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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be a dictator will face off. both opponents and supporters of the president hauling out people and major marches expected on tuesday. >> heather: steve, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions
you overseas where the u.s. embassy in cairo is shutting its doors to the public today as police clash with demonstrators in a new round of violent protests in tahrir square. all this comes as we wait to hear from president morsi who's expected to appear on egyptian television, and it could be his appearance as soon as this hour. steve harrigan's in cairo with more. steve? >> reporter: jenna, the protesters are out behind me for the or seventh night in a row, and as you mentioned, part of the u.s. embassy -- the part that deals with the public and visitor -- was shut down today not because the embassy was targeted, but really because of fears of peripheral violence. this whole section of downtown cairo has seen large street protests for the last several days, police and protesters exchanging rocks and tear gas. two buildings on this street were set on fire overnight. those blazes are now out. we are expecting to see egypt's president in a taped television address later today. he'll likely be introducing a new constitution that's being voted on by the assembly now. that constitution can
>> good morning, everyone, it's sunday, november 25th, i'm alisyn camerota. in cairo muslim brotherhood encourages protests. anti-morsi protesters taking over tahrir square. >> dave: and shredder, and police files used as confetti at the macy's day parade. how can it happen? is our security now at risk? >> illinois has the worst budget deficit in the nation and why is the state spending millions of taxpayer dollars on table for prisoners. >> and eco friendly zip lines, maybe they want them to watch "fox & friends" in prison, have you ever thought of that. >> dave: amen, there's some viewers, baby. >> clayton: "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ . >> alisyn:. >> alisyn: good morning, everybody, thanks for joining us bright and early on this sunday morning, we have quite a show for you, including the ongoing debate that dave briggs launched yesterday about yoga pants and we invite you to weigh in this morning. >> clayton: you're still leading this fight and championing this fight. >> alisyn: he's made it a platform. >> dave: i may run for the white house based on yoga pants.
of the u.s. embassy in cairo is now closed. this after violent clashes cutting off access to the u.s. embassy in cairo. there are thousands back in the street and they are angry, demanding president mohammed morsi, the new president step down. steve harrigan streams live in cairo, it is nightfall now. what do we know about the u.s. embassy, steve? >> the u.s. embassy building is really just down the block from where i'm standing here and egypt security forces have put up a 12-foot high call of cinder block to keep that alleyway safe where the embassy is. the public services section which visitors use is closed today. that part of it is closed off. the embassy itself has not been targeted but it is part of a rough taeub rough neighborhood around tahrir square where protestors are throwing rocks and police are firing teargas. two buildings were set on fire, those blazes are now out. warnings issued to all americans to avoid the downtown area over the next few days due to the unrest, bill. bill: when will the new egyptian president morsi speak, do we know that, steve? >> reporter: we
. -- >> that policy, don, when you watcha what had happened happenn cairo at the embassy there, in been ben at our consulate and a variety of embassy locations around september 11, how do you respond when people ask, is history repeating itself? is this 1979 all over again? >> we saw in cairo, after a day or two, the egyptian government absolutely stepped in and provided the kind of security that we needed. so cairo is a slightly different case. but in benghazi, we see that the government there is not capable of providing the security that we needed there and so, you have a tragedy which was in some senses avoidable and goes beyond the deaths of that's four very brave americans. it really is a foreign policy failure. and so, you need to tie the issue of adequate security for the compound for the larger issue of what our foreign policy is and what our foreign policy image is overseas. >> i would love to have that discussion with you in the future. it's a big discussion and one that we want to have. it's great to have nuthe program. thank you for sharing your thoughts, your memories today. we look f
in cairo. hillary clinton will be arriving later this evening to have negotiations with her israeli counterparts as well as palestinian officials. she will also be heading to cairo to meet with morsi who is meeting with the u.n. secretary general and so every is hoping truth does stick. officials have been hinting there could be one in the next several hours. but on the ground, they are bracing for a possible ground invasion with thousands of soldiers on the border. back to you. >> stay with us over there. we'll be watching hopefully it doesn't happen, but a possibility. we appreciate your report. the nbc team over there, rich article ard engel, he must live in the area because he's always where needs to be. always things exploding around. >> when we come back, we'll talk more about the stories that are likely to drive today's trading, including the crisis in the middle east. we've also got earnings coming up and a speech from ben bernanke. we'll be talking about the looming fiscal cliff. we'll put them all into perspective. i'm glad we got cdw and cisco to design our data center. y
tension in the middle east. this is cairo, egypt. this is the scene in tahrir square and almost nightfall. look at the crowd that has gathered after lawmakers approve a new constitution threatening to inflame already tense situation between the opposition and the heart-line government. steve hair gan streaming -- harrigan, streaming live in cairo, egypt the constitution already written. coming under sharp criticism. what do we know about it, steve? >> reporter: it is being criticized by opponents of this government. first of all people say it is a rush job. they basically pulled an all-nighter last night to write a constitution. 16 hours of debate. finally getting it through. there is real concerns about the role of islamic law in the new constitution. concerns about the protection of women's rights in this constitution. basically this is document written by the muslim brotherhood because all liberal members of this assembly walked out long ago, bill. bill: is there a chance that will diffuse the protests we have seen so far, steve? >> reporter: the hopes were on the president's side that
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
of diplomatic activity taking place in cairo as egypt's president intelligence officials try to broker a truce between the palestinian factions and israel. turkish prime minister also in cairo and later today the u.n. secreta secretary-general ban ki-moon is expected to try to solidify a cessation of hostilities. the conflict is ongoing. hospital officials tell nbc news they are operating at a very limited capacity, they are afraid a ground invasion may push the health facilities here to the brink of collapse. >> thank you, we appreciate that report. eamon moyhedin. we'll have more on the tensions in the middle east throughout the morning. let's get back to this discussion that we were having and i'll make what i was trying to, what my case was, steve and jere jeremy, and even countries that deserve austerity it's easier said than done because people will immediately say you've just made it worse and you took a recession and turned it into almost a depression, so it's almost like people want you to extend the, you know, the credit card, give your wayward teenage son an additional $50,000 on th
on americans. he goes on to say, this seems to be different than cairo attacks. yet the ambassador to the u.n. going out that morning and told everybody it was the tape. what does all this mean to you? >> it means that obviously cbs is not carrying out their responsibilities of informing the american people, but this is not the first action of this nature by a major network, but it is what it is. it's in their dna. what i've been finding out is i've been traveling around the country nonstop for the last two months, has been that americans are fed up. our veterans are angry in a way that i have never seen them angry. i'm seeing active duty people who come over and tell me, i've lost trust. i've lost trust in this commander in chief. i'm telling you, i don't know how much it affects the election and i don't know -- i know there is 1.6 million veterans in florida. they are angry. they have lost their trust in this commander in chief. and they want a full and complete investigation. the only way you're going to get a full and complete investigation is a watergate-type select committee that's bi
.s. ambassador has now extended to several dozen people. many of them with ties into egypt and cairo. what more do you know about that, sir? >> we do know that there are dozens of suspects. this threes right in the -- flies in the face of the administration told us that this was some mob and a video that got out of control. what is clear from the beginning it was terrorist attack that was coordinated. there were terrorist at it being activities in benghazi in months leading up to this. thanks to senator lindsey graham we're able to interview somebody there in tunisia. bill: you were just in tripoli. you did not come back with a favorable review. you have alleged that the administration is stonewalling. is that still the case now or has there been a little give-and-take on some information and questions you have? >> hopefully now we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did not. i sent the first letter over to secretary clinton on september 20th. they had the gal to print out pages on internet site and pretend they were somehow complying
on the streets of cairo. back to you. >> steve: all right. live in jerusalem with the very latest. thank you. >> gretchen: and now the rest of today's headlines for monday. thousands of workers protesting today demanding justice for a factory fire. this happened in bangladesh. 112 people died. crowds are block streets and throwing rocks at the burned out garment factory, many workers were trapped in the building because if you can believe this, there were no emergency exits for them. there are reports that some of the clothes being made there were for wal-mart, sears, and the clothing line of sean colmes. >>> in two hours, west virginia congresswoman shelly moore capito will announce her candidacy for senate. she was just elected to her 7th term in congress is a pro choice republican. she will run for democrat jay rockefeller's seat. the 75-year-old held that seat since 1984. >>> here is a question for you, should a mentally handicapped person be executed for committing murder? that's the question that will be debated in one courtroom this morning. for the next two weeks, lawyer also argue t
to this because you know, everyone in this room should read the robert cairo for falling on lyndon johnson to pursue additional already read the first three. at the fourth one, and it is available on cds. it's 26 cds long. and if you're curious how long that takes, that's a drive from washington, d.c. to tampa, florida, where they have the republican convention, to charlotte where democrats had their convention, fort bragg, back to charlotte, washington. that's 26 cds. [laughter] but i have this image of lyndon johnson spinning in his grave at the idea that there is a president of the united states that has minimal interaction with congress. and particularly someone of his own party. and when you, let's just forget republicans and let's forget tea party people. forget them. just in his own party, wander around the hill as all of you to around all the time and ask members of the democratic at how much personal interaction you have with the president. and i have, you know, i hate giving political credit for anything, but they had that piece back in may. just pointed out that the president, a
the world come and my point is this. whether you are in baltimore brazil, kansas city or cairo, that our young men and women with desire and potential to build a bright future, to work on business and social innovations that can unleash an new wave of opportunity and economic growth. for this generation, the internet is a primary platform for innovation, where their future is being invented. my experience has convinced me that we are at a crossroads. the threats are real. but nothing i've seen has shaken my optimism. working hard and working together, i'm convinced that we can turn back the threats and ensure that all people benefit from the amazing opportunities of the internet and that we can, as newt minow taught us, harness new communications technologies to help deliver a future of prosperity and peace. thank you. [applause] >> terrific. thank you very much, chairman genachowski. and also want to thank you on behalf of my company, ibm. you sustained a really constructive dialogue with my chairman and ceo, both new and old one, over the years in the administration. thank you very muc
coordinator to remain in cairo to support the efforts to achieve a sustainable cease- fire. finally, mr. president, let me conclude, as i have in all my discussions with intensity, that in these testing times, we must not lose sight that peace must remain our priority. a two-state solution ending the occupation, and ending the conflict between israel and the palestinians is more urgent than ever. achieving this vision, which has been expressed by this council, has been long overdue and necessary for the stability of the region. comprehensive peace can lead -- can bring lasting security. i am leaving shortly. i wish you a happy thanksgiving. thank you, mr. president. >> i thank the secretary general for his briefing. there are no more names inscribed on the list of speakers. david plouffe and steve schmidt discuss the 2012 eletion next. later, the chairman of cbs news, jeff fager on the future of journalism and cbs news. tomorrow, university of maryland professor shibley telhami on israel and hamas cease-fire. then, poverty in the united states. jacqueline pata explains with the sequest
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)